Dom’s Ranking of the Most Livable Cities

san-fran

By Dom Nozzi

What makes a city livable? It’s a commonly debated question—and an important one for cities striving to improve their quality of life. What makes a community pleasant? What leads its citizens to feel a sense of pride in where they live? There are an enormous number of potential criteria for assessing the livability of a city.

Mostly, my assessment criteria ask: Does the city establish and honor a high-quality, human-scaled public realm—the public streets, sidewalks, and parks? Are the streets and the spaces between buildings within the human “habitat” modest enough to make humans—not cars—feel comfortable? Do the streets and buildings create an enjoyable, human-scaled sense of enclosure, instead of leaving people feeling exposed and assaulted in an Anywhere USA parking lot moonscape?

 Has public life blossomed? Is there a sense of place? Does a person often find oneself in an outdoor living room providing ample opportunities for social interaction with neighbors and fellow citizens?asheville

Has the community avoided the path so many contemporary American cities have taken, whereby the community turns its back on, and neglects, the public realm—striving instead to single-mindedly make cars happy—and focusing its attention solely on improvements to the private realm (the insides of homes, offices, cars and stores)? A car-happy place, in other words, where there is public squalor and private grandeur? Where “quality of life” can only be found inside a luxurious McMansion home or an expensive car?

beacon-hill-bostonPrimarily, a livable city recognizes that the foundation for livability is to create a magnificent public realm that instills civic pride. A place where residents are fiercely protective of the cherished features of their beloved community, and therefore always working to improve their streets, their sidewalks and parks—knowing that these are the wellsprings of a high quality of life. Where the needs of people are the prime focus, instead of the downwardly spiraling path of providing for the “needs” of cars.

Here are the criteria I use when assessing the livability of a community.

1. A livable city has walkable, mixed use, higher-density, mixed-income neighborhoods where it is a pleasant, short walk to a store, an office, a transit stop, a friends’ house, a school or a park.

2. A livable city has vibrant, exciting, sociable, charming, human-scaled pedestrian experiences.

3. A livable city has little or no wide, multi-lane, high-speed highway and road infrastructure within its central area. And few, if any, one-way streets, strip commercial development or cul-de-sacs.

4. A livable city has modest, traffic-calmed, tree-lined streets with on-street parking. Few, if any, roads are larger than 3 lanes in size.

5. A livable city has high-quality public squares and public parks.

6. A livable city has quality, locally-owned cuisine—some of which feature outdoor cafes found on a vibrant sidewalk.cafenite

7. A livable city has quality transit. The service is frequent and easy to use.

8. A livable city has a quality nightlife. The city does not close down at 5 pm.

9. A livable city has quality bicycle and pedestrian facilities and a large number of bicyclists and pedestrians. Life without a car is perfectly possible and enjoyable.

10. A livable city has little in the way of surface parking—particularly FREE off-street parking.

11. A livable city has a compact downtown full of higher-density housing and diverse retail.sienna

12. A livable city has quality culture (entertainment, speeches, arts, etc.) and a quality university.

13. A livable city has a high degree of civic pride, and a tradition of working to protect their unique, treasured features.

14. A livable city has magnificent historic architecture.

15. A livable city has little in the way of excruciating, infuriating noise pollution (screaming emergency sirens, leaf blowers, vacuum trucks, helicopters, etc., are under control).

 rome1

Given these criteria, here is a list (in no particular order) of the best cities I have visited in the world

 

Rome

Copenhagen

Sienna Italy

San Francisco

Boulder CO

Portland OR

New York City

Lucca Italy

Venice Italy

Paris

Burlington VT

Madison WI

Vancouver BC

Nantucket & Martha’s Vineyard

Key West

St Augustine FL

Charleston SC

Savannah GA

Missoula and Bozeman MT

Annapolis and Georgetown

Portland ME

Malmo Sweden

Athens GA

Victoria BC

Boston

Asheville NC

 

 

_________________________________________________

Visit my urban design website read more about what I have to say on those topics. You can also schedule me to give a speech in your community about transportation and congestion, land use development and sprawl, and improving quality of life.

Visit: www.walkablestreets.wordpress.com

Or email me at: dom[AT]walkablestreets.com

50 Years Memoir CoverMy memoir can be purchased here: Paperback = http://goo.gl/9S2Uab Hardcover =  http://goo.gl/S5ldyF

My book, The Car is the Enemy of the City (WalkableStreets, 2010), can be purchased here: http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/the-car-is-the-enemy-of-the-city/10905607Car is the Enemy book cover

My book, Road to Ruin, can be purchased here:

http://www.amazon.com/Road-Ruin-Introduction-Sprawl-Cure/dp/0275981290

My Adventures blog

http://domnozziadventures.wordpress.com/

Run for Your Life! Dom’s Dangerous Opinions blog

http://domdangerous.wordpress.com/

My Town & Transportation Planning website

http://walkablestreets.wordpress.com/

My Plan B blog

https://domz60.wordpress.com/

My Facebook profile

http://www.facebook.com/dom.nozzi

My YouTube video library

http://www.youtube.com/user/dnozzi

My Picasa Photo library

https://picasaweb.google.com/105049746337657914534

My Author spotlight

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/domatwalkablestreetsdotcom

 

 

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