Road Diet Bibliography

By Dom Nozzi

Recently, I prepared a “Transportation White Paper” for a local advocacy group. One question I got was whether I could cite any cities (either in the U.S. or abroad) that have downsized city streets via a “road diet,” where travel or turn lanes are removed?  The person noted it was always good to have precedents when something is newly proposed, and also good to know the results when the proposal was tried elsewhere.

With that request, I went ahead and prepared the following citations regarding studies pertaining to road diets in America.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Welch, T. “The Conversion of Four-Lane Undivided Urban Roadways to Three-Lane Facilities.” Presented at the Transportation Research Board / Institute for Transportation Engineers Urban Street Symposium, Dallas, TX, June 28-30, 1999. http://nacto.org/docs/usdg/conversion_of_four_lane_undivided_urban_roadways.pdf [reduced crashes, traffic calming enhanced, improved emergency vehicle response times]

 

 

 

Another question someone asked me about my draft White Paper was whether there was any scientific data that shows that reducing a four-lane street to three lanes (a common form of road diet) has very little impact on congestion or traffic delays?  The questioner understood the argument, but I’d like to see some empirical data. Here is the list of studies I prepared for that question.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Welch, T. “The Conversion of Four-Lane Undivided Urban Roadways to Three-Lane Facilities.” Presented at the Transportation Research Board / Institute for Transportation Engineers Urban Street Symposium, Dallas, TX, June 28-30, 1999. http://nacto.org/docs/usdg/conversion_of_four_lane_undivided_urban_roadways.pdf [reduced crashes, traffic calming enhanced, improved emergency vehicle response times]

 

A final question from the advocacy group regarding my draft White Paper road diet before and afterwas:  “Where do we go from here?”  This person noted that the group was likely to get enthusiastic support for road diets from bicyclists, but “may” lose credibility with the much-broader middle class of drivers in the community.   It’s going to be an uphill battle, according to this person, to convince drivers that less parking and more congestion is a good thing.

 

My response was as follows…

 

In my experience, right-sizing streets (or “re-purposing” streets) typically meets with opposition from business owners and other citizens – particularly regional commuters. However, right-sizing almost invariably results in such substantial, rapid improvements in business and residential climate, crash road_diet_examplereduction, absence of feared congestion increase, and improved quality of life that the initial opposition tends to quickly change to broad support. Indeed, In Seattle WA, road diets resulted in such obviously beneficial outcomes for businesses and residences along the dieted streets that property owners on two other arterial streets asked for the road diet treatment on their streets. Overall, Seattle has completed over 30 road diets, according to Peter Lagerwey. Therefore, right-sizing streets is a matter of political leadership. Those communities with leadership are successfully able to substantially improve their community. Those without such leadership fail to enjoy such success.

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Filed under Road Diet, Urban Design

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