Fixing Transportation Problems With Pricing in Boulder Colorado

 

By Dom Nozzi

February 21, 2010

How can we improve transportation in Boulder, Colorado? Here are some of my ideas.

I prefer the efficiency of pricing as a lever to achieve GHG emission objectives, rather than land use policies.

I am convinced that we need to address the enormous problem of travel externalities.

Most all of the roads and parking in the Boulder area are either un-priced or underpriced. That means we have an enormous number of low-value car trips in the metro area. Since the costs of motorized travel is largely (exclusively?) externalized, we are experiencing an excessive number of motorized trips.

We need to institute and then calibrate road and parking pricing more comprehensively. We still have excessive GHG emissions, so those prices need to be ratcheted up until motorized SOV travel is reduced sufficiently. Revenue from the pricing needs to be why-tolls-are-neededexclusively dedicated to non-SOV travel (transit, bicycle, pedestrian), and perhaps toward assisting local governments to pay for the work needed to prepare new policies and regulations.

I recognize that pricing can have negative social impacts on other worthy community objectives, such as the need to allow lower-income groups to affordably live in the area, or commute to lower-pay jobs from remote locations (where false economies are assumed – but which often do not pan out when added travel costs are factored in). I therefore support travel pricing rebates or travel subsidies when lower-income people can provide sufficient evidence that they are low-income. Part of this affordable housing issue is the need to have the City provide adequate quantities of housing that is situated in mixed-use, relatively compact neighborhoods, so that the household can own less motor vehicles and devote more of the household income to housing instead of a second, third or fourth car.

By the way, while living in Richmond VA, I noticed that while the city has way too much free parking in the metro area, there are quite admirable road pricing strategies (via toll booths found on a number of metro roads and highways). I say this not because Richmond is an example of a city that has used pricing tactics to avoid sprawl (indeed, it has sprawled more than most any city in the US over the past few decades), but because the city shows that such road pricing is politically and financially feasible.

 

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Filed under Economics, Transportation

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