The Indirect Opposition to Affordable Housing in Boulder, Colorado

By Dom Nozzi

July 24, 2018

People in Boulder often pay lip service to wanting more affordable housing in Boulder. But those same people are too often the ones who most strongly oppose the effective tactics to make housing more affordable in Boulder.

For example, such people tend to strongly oppose smaller residential lot sizes (ie, more density than is currently allowed, taller buildings than are currently allowed, ADUs and co-ops are legal), even though smaller lot sizes are an extremely effective way to make housing more affordable in a city where property values are sky high. A side note here is that City Council made a terrible mistake by reducing the maximum building height in several urban locations to 35 feet. This very low height maximum is only suitable for single-family residential areas.

Such people tend to oppose eliminating the requirement that new development must provide parking, even though required parking requires the property owner to devote a large amount of very expensive land be devoted to car storage.

A great many in Boulder tend to be vigorously opposed to allowing retail and offices in residential neighborhoods, even though doing this would significantly enhance the ability of a household to own less cars (each car costs an American household about $10,000 per year).

A large number in Boulder tend to angrily oppose road diets, even though doing this would significantly enhance the ability of a household to own less cars.

A great many people in Boulder tend to oppose more housing along transit corridors near their neighborhood, even though doing this would significantly enhance the ability of a household to own less cars.

Large numbers of Boulder citizens tend to oppose making it easier than it currently is to replace surface parking with homes and retail in Boulder, even though such housing can be substantially less expensive than conventional housing, and even though doing this would significantly enhance the ability of a household to own less cars.

Many Boulder citizens tend to oppose allowing a larger number of unrelated people to live together, even though this would obviously reduce the expenses of each person living in a house.

Most Boulder citizens tend to strongly oppose eliminating required building setbacks, even though doing so would obviously reduce housing costs, since less very expensive land would be required to be bought by the homebuyer.

Large numbers of Boulder citizens tend to oppose allowing duplexes and triplexes in single-family neighborhoods, even though this is obviously a way to make housing more affordable (less land would be needed per house). As a side note, such opposition would be reduced if duplexes and triplexes were built using timeless traditional design rather than unlovable, jarring, context-oblivious modernist design.

Many in Boulder (particularly bicyclists) tend to oppose allowing the City to install more on-street parking, even though this would allow for a significant reduction in housing/retail/office cost, since many households and businesses could avoid needing to devote expensive land to off-street parking.

Most Boulder residents tend to oppose requiring free parking at office and retail establishments to be metered/priced parking instead of being free parking, even though this would greatly reduce the cost of doing business in Boulder.

Most Boulder residents tend to be against requiring all housing sold in Boulder to unbundle the price of parking from the price of the housing, even though this eliminates the ability of households to opt to avoid paying the very high cost of required parking they may not need.

Many Boulder residents tend to oppose traffic calming all major streets in Boulder, even though this would allow households to own a lower number of expensive cars.

A large number of Boulder residents tend to oppose requiring owners of parking spaces (residential, office, retail, etc.) to pay a tax for each space owned, even though this requirement would result in a large decrease in the provision of very expensive parking.

Most Boulder residents tend to oppose offering density bonuses for building timeless, traditional, lovable buildings rather than modernist buildings, even though this would clearly result in reduced housing costs.

Many Boulder residents tend to oppose replacing zoning-based land development code with a form-based code, and applying special area plans throughout the city, even though this would, again, allow households to own a smaller number of very expensive cars.

 

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Filed under Bicycling, Politics, Road Diet, Transportation, Urban Design, Walking

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